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I'm a librarian based in the UK who loves books. I'm happiest when I'm either talking about them, reading them or buying them. This blog is dedicated mainly to my addiction to YA fiction but you will also find some adult and non-fiction book reviews as well.

Monday, 5 June 2017

Review: Caraval - Stephanie Garber

Caraval by Stephanie Garber, published by Hodder and Stoughton on 31st January 2017

Goodreads synopsis:

Scarlett has never left the tiny isle of Trisda, pining from afar for the wonder of Caraval, a once-a-year week-long performance where the audience participates in the show.

Caraval is Magic. Mystery. Adventure. And for Scarlett and her beloved sister Tella it represents freedom and an escape from their ruthless, abusive father.

When the sisters' long-awaited invitations to Caraval finally arrive, it seems their dreams have come true. But no sooner have they arrived than Tella vanishes, kidnapped by the show's mastermind organiser, Legend.

Scarlett has been told that everything that happens during Caraval is only an elaborate performance. But nonetheless she quickly becomes enmeshed in a dangerous game of love, magic and heartbreak. And real or not, she must find Tella before the game is over, and her sister disappears forever.




Review:
‘Caraval’ is a book that I wanted to read as soon as I first heard about it. It sounded exactly like my kind of story. I’m pleased to say that I loved it as much as I was expecting to and couldn’t put it down. It was a glorious read that quite literally swept me away.  

The story centres around Scarlett and her sister Tella, who are desperate to escape their home on the Isle of Trisda. Scarlett is the main narrator and paints a bleak picture of life with their controlling father. They are punished if they step out of line and they are not allowed to do anything or go anywhere without their father’s approval. Escape is the only thing on their minds, although they each have different plans for their method of escape.  

Julian is the sailor who comes into their lives and presents them with a way off the island. Caraval is the once a year, week long performance that they are invited to take part in and which gives them an opportunity to win something priceless which might change their lives forever. 

I thought that Scarlett was a fantastic main character and someone that I enjoyed reading about immensely. I identified with the protective nature of her relationship with her sister and her feelings of responsibility towards her. The two siblings are very different in nature but Scarlett knows that she would do anything for her sister. I also really loved the love-hate relationship between Scarlett and Julian and seeing how the link between them changes and grows as the story progresses. 

All of kinds of unusual things happen as part of Caraval and the trick for the reader is to figure out what they should believe and who they should trust. Magical, mysterious and enchanting are words that instantly spring to mind about this story. I really never wanted this book to end. ‘Caraval’ was a glorious technicolour adventure with surprises around every corner. I never had any idea what was going to happen next which was such a treat to experience. I’m a reader that nearly always guesses the plot twists!

The ending left me in no doubt that we haven’t seen the last of Caraval and I for one can’t wait to continue the adventure. 

Thursday, 1 June 2017

Review: Show Stopper - Hayley Barker

Show Stopper by Hayley Barker, published by Scholastic on 1st June 2017


Goodreads synopsis:
Set in a near-future England where the poorest people in the land must watch their children be taken by a travelling circus – to perform at the mercy of hungry lions, sabotaged high wires and a demonic ringmaster. The ruling class visit the circus as an escape from their structured, high-achieving lives – pure entertainment with a bloodthirsty edge. Ben, the teenage son of a draconian government minister, visits the circus for the first time and falls instantly in love with Hoshiko, a young performer. They come from harshly different worlds – but must join together to escape the circus and put an end to its brutal sport.



Review:
‘Show Stopper’ by Hayley Barker was a really unique and original read. I whizzed through it pretty quickly because it was gripping and fast-flowing and hard to put down. 

There were two things that I particularly enjoyed about the book. The first was that the author has chosen to base the concept for the story on the divide which is apparent in today’s society between natural born citizens and immigrants. The twist on this, is that she has depicted a near-future society where immigrants have become so reviled that they are called ‘dregs’. Their lives are not valued, they have been ostracised and pushed aside and in some cases, their children have been taken from them. In comparison, the ‘pures’ consider themselves to be the best of society and as the ruling class, they treat the ‘dregs’ as nothing more than servants or a tool for their own entertainment. I thought this was such a brilliant story idea as it’s so topical and explored at its most extreme.

The second thing that I loved about ‘Show Stopper’ is the fact that most of the action is set in the circus. There just aren’t enough stories which use the big tent as a back-drop and yet it’s something that always really attracts me towards a book. Barker’s circus is a place where dreg children are taken and made to perform for the entertainment of the pures. They are given little food, kept in squalid conditions and seen as expendable commodities. If their deaths provide an evening’s entertainment then so be it.

The way that the story wove between the two perspectives of Ben, a pure and Hoshiko, a tight-rope walker was fantastic. I particularly enjoyed the scenes with Hoshiko who is at the mercy of the circus ring-leader and although physically beaten down, never lets her will to live and her desire for freedom, die. Ben is fascinated by Hoshiko and through her, his ideas about right and wrong, freedom and liberation, begin to change. It’s Hoshiko’s relationship with some of the other circus performers though that I especially enjoyed reading about. They have become a family in response to being taken away from their own flesh and blood.

If the thought of a YA novel set in the circus isn’t enough to whet your appetite, then I can tell you that this is also an imaginative and unique read which is wonderfully written and a treat to dive into. Get your hands on this book as soon as you can!
         

Tuesday, 30 May 2017

Review: The Possible - Tara Altebrando

The Possible by Tara Altebrando, published by Bloomsbury Childrens on 1st June 2017



Goodreads synopsis:
It's been thirteen years since Kaylee's infamous birth mother, Crystal, received a life sentence for killing Kaylee's little brother in a fit of rage. Once the centre of a cult-following for her apparent telekinetic powers, nowadays nobody's heard of Crystal.

Until now, when a reporter shows up at Kaylee's house and turns her life upside down, offering Kaylee the chance to be part of a high-profile podcast investigating claims that Crystal truly did have supernatural mind powers. But these questions lead to disturbing answers as Kaylee is forced to examine her own increasingly strange life, and make sense of certain dark and troubling coincidences .




Review:
‘The Possible’ is the first book that I’ve read by Tara Altebrando but it definitely won’t be the last because boy, was it good!  I read it in one evening because I couldn’t put it down.
 
What I particularly liked about this title was that the story wasn’t formulaic and it made me question everything that I was reading.  I wasn’t sure whether or not I could trust Kaylee, the narrator of the book and so this threw a lot of doubt onto some of the events that took place throughout the story.  Did it really happen?  Is Kaylee telling the truth?  Half of the fun of the book was trying to unravel everything and find out what was really going on.  This kept me on the edge of my seat as the mystery deepened and the suspense intensified.
 
I have to admit that the plot of the book is not normally one that would attract me.  The main character Kaylee is approached by a woman who is making a podcast series about her birth mother Crystal.  Twelve years ago, Crystal was found guilty of killing Kaylee’s younger brother Jack but always maintained her innocence.  At the time of the murder, there was quite a bit of furore surrounding Crystal and whether or not she had telekinetic powers.  This definitely isn’t the type of story that would appeal to me normally but I was in the mood for something different and this fit the bill.  What was so great, is that I ended up loving it.  It really hooked me in and I was desperate to get to the bottom of the mystery. 
 
As Kaylee finds out more about her birth mother and remembers her own role in events at the time, she becomes more and more curious about her own abilities.  I like the way that Tara Altebrando explores the topic of perception and shows that a lot of things that happen can be interpreted or seen in different ways, according to the individual’s perception of them.  Kaylee is quite a unusual narrator and I wasn’t entirely sure that I liked her in the beginning, but she had grown on me a lot by the end of the book.
 
I would encourage you to pick up ‘The Possible’ if you are a fan of mysteries, love a good suspense novel or are just looking for something different and original to read.  I want to read Altebrando’s entire back catalogue now which I hope are all as good as this brilliant title.       

Thursday, 25 May 2017

Review: Runemarks - Joanne M. Harris

Runemarks by Joanne M. Harris, published by Gollancz on 20th April 2017


Goodreads synopsis:
It's been five hundred years since the end of the world and society has rebuilt itself anew. The old Norse gods are no longer revered. Their tales have been banned. Magic is outlawed, and a new religion - the Order - has taken its place.

In a remote valley in the north, fourteen-year-old Maddy Smith is shunned for the ruinmark on her hand - a sign associated with the Bad Old Days. But what the villagers don't know is that Maddy has skills. According to One-Eye, the secretive Outlander who is Maddy's only real friend, her ruinmark - or runemark, as he calls it - is a sign of Chaos blood, magical powers and gods know what else..

Now, as the Order moves further north, threatening all the Worlds with conquest and Cleansing, Maddy must finally learn the truth to some unanswered questions about herself, her parentage, and her powers.



Review:
I thought that ‘Runemarks’ was magnificent and one of Joanne M. Harris’s best books. I loved ‘The Gospel of Loki’ which I’d read previously and this was just as good, if not better.  

It’s aimed at a YA audience, although the story is so sophisticated and the adventure so thrilling that I think adults would also enjoy it.  

I really love Norse mythology and tales about the Gods – Loki, Thor and Odin. I’ll admit that I don’t always remember every one of the varied cast of characters but I enjoy reading about them immensely, especially Loki the Trickster. I only wish that my knowledge and understanding was better so that I could appreciate all of the nuances even more.

Harris has done an incredible job weaving a story around them. The catalyst for the tale is a young girl called Maddy who lives in the small village of Malbry and has a special mark on her hand – a runemark no less, which gives her magical abilities. She also has an unusual friendship with a one-eyed stranger who visits her every year.     

Maddy and her journey through the World Below with Loki (am I the only one that pictures Tom Hiddleston in my mind every time he is mentioned?!) was thrilling to read and kept me gripped for all 513 pages of this bumper book. There are twists and turns aplenty, as well as tons of excitement and adventure and some life and death situations thrown into the mix too. I loved it all!  

I really need to read ‘Runelight’ now. I didn’t even know that there was a follow-on when I started reading this book but now I want it desperately. ‘Runemarks’ had me enthralled and I can’t wait to continue the adventure.

Monday, 22 May 2017

Review: Fire in You - Jennifer L. Armentrout

Fire in You by Jennifer L. Armentrout, published by Hodder on 27th April 2017
Goodreads synopsis:
Six years ago, Jillian Lima's whole world was destroyed. The same night her childhood love Brock Mitchell broke her heart, her life was irrevocably altered by a stranger with a gun. After years spent slowly rebuilding the shattered pieces of her life, Jillian is finally ready to stop existing in a past full of pain and regret and is determined to start living. The one thing she never expected was the impossibly handsome Brock walking back into her life...

Brock can't believe that the breathtaking woman standing before him now is the little girl who used to be his shadow growing up. Unable to stay away from each other, their tentative friendship soon sparks into something more and the red-hot chemistry sizzling between them can no longer be denied. But falling for Brock again risks more than just Jillian's heart. When the past resurfaces, and a web of lies threatens to rip them apart, the fallout could lay waste to everything they've ever cared about...




Review:
‘Fire in You’ was a sizzling and sensational romance. I absolutely loved it. Jennifer L. Armentrout is one of my favourite authors and she hands down writes the BEST romances.

It’s funny because when I started reading this book, I wasn’t completely sold on the character of Brock. He seemed to have just waltzed back into Jillian’s life on a whim and he appeared overly cocky and arrogant. But then I began to fall for him as he showed his softer more caring side. He won’t give up on Jillian and is determined to prove to her that he is there to stay. By the second half of the book I wanted them to get together so badly.

I loved Jillian. She’s been in love with Brock ever since she was a little girl. She has never loved anyone else like she loves him. She’s also incredibly brave and has had to overcome the events of one terrible night which is continually hinted at throughout the first half of the story. 

I really liked the setting of the book and the backgrounds of the characters. Jillian comes from a long line of Lima’s, who run a very successful family business. They own a string of mixed martial arts facilities where they train fighters. Brock is one of their MMA champions. These are definitely not your traditional occupations but I enjoyed reading about them.   

As Brock begins to break through Jillian’s defences, she starts to open up to him and shows him a side of her that she had long hidden. I loved the scenes where they begin to get to know each other again. They were perfectly written and one of my favourite parts of the book.

‘Fire in You’ was absolutely fantastic and such a treat to read. I’m eager now to get my hands on all of the other books in the series. There were lots of different characters and couples referenced throughout the story and I’m looking forward to reading more about how they all ended up together.:

Friday, 19 May 2017

Review: Crimson and Bone - Marina Fiorato

Crimson and Bone by Marina Fiorato, published by Hodder and Stoughton on 18th May 2017


Goodreads synopsis:
London, 1853.
Annie Stride is a beautiful, flame-haired young woman from the East End of London. She is also a whore. On a bleak January night Annie stands on Waterloo Bridge, watching the icy waters of the Thames writhe beneath her as she contemplates throwing herself in. At the last minute she's rescued by a handsome young man.
Her saviour, Francis Maybrick Gill, is a talented artist. He takes Annie as his muse, painting her again and again and transforming her from a fallen woman into society's darling, taking her far away from her old life.
But there is darkness underpinning Annie's lavish new lifestyle. In London and in Florence, prostitutes are being murdered. There's someone out there who knows who Annie really is - and they won't let her forget where she came from...




Review:
I am always eager to read anything by Marina Fiorato because her stories are captivating and her writing is beautifully lyrical and descriptive. Her newest offering, ‘Crimson and Bone’, was a real treat and I devoured it in a couple of evenings.  

The story focuses on a common prostitute, Annie Stride, who at the beginning of the book is ready to end it all. Life has not been kind to her and down on her luck, she decides that she doesn’t want to live anymore. Events however, take a different turn, when she is saved by a handsome painter, Francis Maybrick Gill, who offers her comfort and safety in return for her becoming his model.

At the beginning of each chapter, Annie’s story is accompanied by that of Mary Jane who was Annie’s best friend. At the start of the book, I wasn’t entirely sure why this was included, but as Annie’s story progresses, it made a lot more sense and all the threads of their stories wove together brilliantly at the end.

My favourite part of the book was actually the beginning which was set in London. It was interesting to see Annie adjust to her new surroundings and gradually become more refined under Francis’s tutelage. She revels in no longer having to share her body with a man and in being protected by someone with seemingly pure and good motives. The other two parts of the book are set in Florence and Venice. I could sense Marina Fiorato’s love of these places in the way the language of the book flowed so easily in these sections and in the way she described Annie’s surroundings.
  
The tension built throughout as the story headed towards a revealing and shocking finale.  I was utterly gripped until the final page as revelations about the main characters come to light.  Overall, 'Crimson and Bone' was a hugely entertaining read and one that I wouldn't hesitate to recommend.

Friday, 5 May 2017

Review: One Italian Summer - Keris Stainton

One Italian Summer by Keris Stainton, published by Hot Key Books on 4th May 2017


Goodreads synopsis:
Milly loves her sisters more than anything - they are her best friends. But this holiday is different. The loss of their dad has left a gaping hole in their lives that none of them know how to fill. Heartbreak is a hard thing to fix ...

Still, there is plenty to keep the girls busy in Rome. A family wedding. Food, wine, parties and sun. And of course Luke .... Luke is hot, there is no way around that. And Milly will always have a crush on him. But this summer is about family, being together, and learning to live without Dad. It isn't about Luke at all ... is it?






Review:
I was so excited to get my hands on a copy of One Italian Summer by Keris Stainton. I bumped it straight to the top of my TBR pile. I’ve loved all of the books I’ve read previously by this author so I couldn’t wait to dive right in. Initially, I thought that the book was going to be quite a light and breezy read. The story is set in Rome and follows three sisters and their mother, as they embark on holiday. This, however, is the first time they have been to Rome without their father. His death has hit them hard and they are all dealing with it in different ways. Grief and bereavement are prominent themes in the book which made some parts quite difficult to read. I felt very emotional while reading certain scenes which really packed a punch. This definitely wasn’t what I was expecting and made this title far more than just a summery, beach read. 

I really loved the relationship between the three sisters, Milly, Leonie and Elyse. It was refreshing to see their sibling bond portrayed in such a positive light, as there seem to be so many books where all the sisters ever do is bicker and squabble. It was interesting to see how each of them coped with their feelings about their father’s death and how his passing had changed their lives. 

The middle sister, Milly, narrates the story, so events are seen through her eyes. She is afraid that everything will be different now that her Dad isn’t with them. She has a constant fear of letting the people around her go. She worries that something might happen to them, which in light of events, is completely understandable. She is also afraid to see Luke, the boy that she has had a crush on for as long as she can remember. As readers, we know that something significant happened between them but we’re not quite sure what until later in the book. Although I thought that the issue of grief was handled well in the story, I wasn’t as convinced by the romance between Milly and Luke. I’m not really sure why but I just didn’t particularly see them being together. This made the whole thing fall a bit flat for me. 

Personally, I enjoyed the fact that the theme of family was at the centre of the book. It was interesting to see how the dynamics of their family had changed and adapted and how the summer trip to Rome brought them all closer together.

If you are looking for a YA contemporary read with real heart then look no further than ‘One Italian Summer’.                

Thursday, 4 May 2017

Review: Girlhood - Cat Clarke

Girlhood by Cat Clarke, published by Quercus Children's Books on 4th May 2017


Goodreads synopsis:
Harper has tried to forget the past and fit in at expensive boarding school Duncraggan Academy. Her new group of friends are tight; the kind of girls who Harper knows have her back. But Harper can't escape the guilt of her twin sister's Jenna's death, and her own part in it - and she knows noone else will ever really understand.

But new girl Kirsty seems to get Harper in ways she never expected. She has lost a sister too. Harper finally feels secure. She finally feels...loved. As if she can grow beyond the person she was when Jenna died. Then Kirsty's behaviour becomes more erratic. Why is her life a perfect mirror of Harper's? And why is she so obsessed with Harper's lost sister? Soon, Harper's closeness with Kirsty begins to threaten her other relationships, and her own sense of identity. How can Harper get back to the person she wants to be, and to the girls who mean the most to her?




Review:
‘Girlhood’ by Cat Clarke is good but I’m afraid that I can’t rave about it like I could with some of her previous books. I did enjoy it and it was well-written but for me, the story itself fell a little short.

It is set at a Scottish all girls boarding school. I love, love, love stories which feature boarding schools. I think this can be traced back to adoring series like the Chalet School and St Clares when I was younger and more recently Robin Stevens Murder Most Unladylike books. It makes for such a brilliant setting for a story.

The first few chapters of ‘Girlhood’ introduce the reader to the main character Harper and her three best friends Rowan, Ama and Lily. There is some background provided to Harper’s family history and Harper confesses that she feels responsible for her sister’s death. Now, at this point, I was expecting the book to develop into a psychological thriller with lots of twists and turns and surprises along the way. That has typically been the formula with most of Cat Clarke’s other books and is something that I always enjoy. Instead, we are presented with a story which focuses mainly on an exploration of the relationship between best friends. In Harper’s case, her friends are like her family. They tell each other everything, spend practically all of their time together and live in each other’s pockets. The close bond between the girls is upset when the dynamic shifts with the arrival of new girl Kirsty. Suddenly their tight little group of four, doesn’t feel quite so cosy anymore.   

When I reflect on the story, I honestly don’t feel that an awful lot happened and that contributed to the slow pace of the narrative. The focus is firmly on how Kirsty’s arrival affects the relationship between Harper and her friends and how things change as they begin to ready themselves for the next step in their lives.

There were some parts which I thought might have been expanded on more, such as the events surrounding Harper’s sister’s death and there were some bits which I felt seemed less than believable, such as the reaction of the girls at the end of the book. With regards to the latter, it appeared that everything was leading up to a big showdown at the end of the story which then didn’t really happen.  

I know that it must sound like I didn’t particularly enjoy ‘Girlhood’ but the truth is that I did. I guess the problem was that I had certain pre-conceived ideas about the book which didn’t match up to the reality of reading it. Although this wasn’t a five star read for me, I have loved some of Cat Clarke’s other books in the past and will still be looking out for new titles by her in the future.

Wednesday, 26 April 2017

Review: Girls Can't Hit - T.S Easton


Girls Can't Hit by T.S Easton, published by Hot Key Books on 20th April 2017


Goodreads synopsis:
Fleur Waters never takes anything seriously - until she turns up at her local boxing club one day, just to prove a point. She's the only girl there, and the warm-up alone is exhausting . . . but the workout gives her an escape from home and school, and when she lands her first uppercut on a punching bag she feels a rare glow of satisfaction. So she goes back the next week, determined to improve.

Fleur's overprotective mum can't abide the idea of her entering a boxing ring, why won't she join her pilates class instead? Her friends don't get it either and even her boyfriend, 'Prince' George, seems concerned by her growing muscles and appetite - but it's Fleur's body, Fleur's life, so she digs her heels in and carries on with her training. When she finally makes it into the ring, her friends and family show their support and Fleur realises that sometimes in life it's better to drop your guard and take a wild swing!






Review:
‘Girls Can’t Hit’ is the third book I’ve read by T.S Easton and I think my favourite one yet. The story centres around a teenager called Fleur who gets bitten by the boxing bug and soon finds herself itching to get inside the ring.

I found that the story started quite slowly and initially I wasn’t sure if it was going to be my kind of book. The first few chapters focused on Fleur and her friends Pip and Blossom who all live in a small village near to the site of the Battle of Hastings. They spend their Saturdays dressed as Saxon peasants, talking to tourists about the Battle and the history of the site. Although the start was slow, what really got me hooked was when Fleur discovers a local boxing club. What starts initially as a protest against the division between men and women’s’ only boxing nights, turns into a real passion for Fleur.

I loved seeing how Fleur channels all of her time and energy into her new hobby. She starts cycling with her Dad, she lifts weights, she trains hard and she eats like she’s never eaten before! Although I’ve never boxed, I do run and I know the discipline it takes to train and get yourself into physical shape. Fleur’s newfound love of boxing isn’t embraced by everyone though and she finds herself at odds with her Mum and at times her friends, over the amount of time she is spending on it.

There is an underlying message about feminism and equal rights in the book, but personally, what really struck a chord with me, was how boxing makes Fleur more confident and ultimately improves her relationships with those close to her. She has a fractious relationship with her Mum which takes a different turn near the end of the story, her Dad loves getting to spend time with her on their bikes and her friends gradually begin to see a new side of her. There’s also Tarik, a handsome boxer at the club, who definitely catches Fleur’s eye.

This turned out to be a brilliantly entertaining read which at times made me laugh out loud. I’d love a follow-up book all about what happens to Fleur next.

Monday, 10 April 2017

Review: The Struggle - Jennifer L. Armentrout

The Struggle by Jennifer L. Armentrout, published by Hodder on 23rd March 2017 

Goodreads synopsis:
The war against the Titans continues, but now the most dangerous, most absolute power lies elsewhere... with Seth.

The Great War fought by the few is coming...
All may doubt and fear what Seth has become. All except Josie, the woman who might be his final chance at redemption.

In the end, the sun will fall...

The only way Seth and Josie can save the future and save themselves is by facing the unknown together. It will take more than trust and faith. It will take love and the kind of strength not easily broken. No matter what, their lives will never be the same.

For what the gods have feared has come to pass. The end of the old is here and the beginning of the new has been ushered in...




Review:
‘The Struggle’ is the third book in Jennifer L. Armentrout’s Titans series and personally I think it may be the best one yet. The action picks up straight after the events of the previous book and we see Seth leaving Josie behind to protect her from what he has become. I’ll admit that I did struggle a little bit at the very beginning to recollect exactly what had happened but it didn’t take long before I had all of the threads of the story straight and from then on I was well and truly sucked back in.  

I have to say that I just love Jennifer’s writing. Her dialogue is always spot on, making me want to laugh and then cry in the space of a heartbeat. She writes amazing characters that come alive on the page and which you instantly want to root for. Also, don’t get me started on the romance. No one can write an intimate scene better than her. The relationship between Seth and Josie is at the heart of the book and it’s tough to see what they both have to endure along the way before they can get anywhere near a happy ending. Josie is determined to find Seth no matter the cost but she has to pay a heavy price and Seth too begins to learn more about who he is and what he is capable of. Both characters are big favourites of mine and it’s been interesting to see them change and grow so much throughout the series. 

The ending consisted of a jaw-dropping cliff-hanger. I’m not sure how I’m going to possibly last before I can get my hands on the next book. The wait is going to be endless.  

There was plenty of action and excitement in ‘The Struggle’ and it kept me gripped the entire time. I practically inhaled it and finished it in one evening. If you haven’t yet discovered this series then you really need to give it a try. I guarantee you won’t be disappointed. It had everything and more that I look for in a book and it was an incredible read.     

Thursday, 6 April 2017

Review: Scorched - Joss Stirling

Scorched by Joss Stirling, published by Oxford University Press on 6th April 2017


Goodreads synopsis:
Ember Lord is facing charges for the murder of her father. She was found at the scene of the crime, holding the murder weapon, and refuses to explain herself.

Joe Masters is tasked with getting under Ember's skin, and breaking through her stony facade; to gain her trust and find out what her plans are now her father's legally-questionable business is under her control.

But as the two get closer, Joe begins to break down the wall that Ember has built around herself, and gets a glimpse of the truth behind. Is he really falling for a cold-hearted killer? Or is there more to the murder than meets the eye?



Review:
‘Scorched’ is the final book in Joss Stirling’s Young Detectives series. It revolves around Joe, who was introduced in earlier instalments of the series and the mysterious Ember Lord, who at the beginning of the book is being held on suspicion of her father’s murder. The story places Ember in the middle of a terrible situation. She struggles to recollect the events of that night and how she came to be standing over her father’s dead body. She is initially not sure of her own innocence and has only one desire – to protect her twin brother Max.


In the training centre where she is being held pending trial, Joe and co. are charged with finding out what she knows about her father’s shady business dealings. Before they do that though, they have to get close to Ember and gain her trust. Hence the staging of a Shakespeare play, ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’, giving Joe the opportunity to get close to Ember without raising her suspicions. I loved the scenes where they are staging the play because it gives Ember a chance to show her true character. She has had to hide who she is to protect herself from her father and his associates but through the words of Shakespeare she begins to open up and we see what kind of person she really is.  

I thought it was interesting to see Joe having so many doubts too about his suitability to be part of the Young Detectives Agency. He is still trying to recover from the events of the first book in the series and his confidence has been knocked terribly. While he is attempting to help Ember open up, she unknowingly, begins to help him see what he is capable of.    

I loved seeing all of the other couples in the story too: Kieron and Raven, Nathan and Kate and Damien and Rose. It reminded me of all the great adventures they’ve had together and what they’ve had to endure to come out stronger on the other side.

‘Scorched’ was a worthy finale to the series but it was sad to say goodbye to so many well loved characters. I can’t wait to see what Joss Stirling is going to write next. I will definitely be along for the ride!

Tuesday, 4 April 2017

Review: The Pavee and the Buffer Girl - Siobhan Dowd

The Pavee and the Buffer Girl by Siobhan Dowd on 2nd March 2017 by The Bucket List



Goodreads synopsis:
Jim and his family have halted by Dundray and the education people have been round mouthing the law. In school the Traveller kids suffer at the hands of teachers and other pupils alike, called 'tinker-stinkers', 'dirty gyps' and worse. Then the punches start. The only friendly face is Kit, a settled girl who takes Jim under her wing and teaches him to read in the great cathedral chamber of the cave below the town. With Kit and the reading, Jim seems to have found a way to exist in Dundray, but everyday prejudice and a shocking act of violence see his life uprooted once again.







Review:
This graphic novel was a quick read but at the same time I found it to be very touching.  The story is illustrated beautifully by Emma Shoard in an extremely unique style which helps to bring life to Siobhan Dowd's words.  Apparently this was originally published as part of an anthology which I would be interested to read.

The story is about a traveller boy or a Pavee as he is known, who develops a new friendship with a non-traveller or a Buffer girl.  Jim and Kit are both outsiders but the relationship that forms between them, helps each of them to feel less alone.  As Jim has never properly attended school before, Kit helps him to learn to read and gives him the gift of words.  However, when something terrible happens, everything changes.

I found the ending quite sad but at the same time it was tinged with hope for the future.  I would recommend this title if you are looking for something short but moving to read.    



Thursday, 23 March 2017

Review: See How They Lie - Sue Wallman

See How They Lie by Sue Wallman, published by Scholastic on 2nd March 2017

Goodreads synopsis:
If you got to live in a luxury hotel with world-class cuisine, a state-of-the-art sports centre and the latest spa treatments, would you say ‘yes please’?
Well, that’s kind of what Hummingbird Creek is like. No wonder Mae feels lucky to be there. It’s meant as a rich-kid’s sanatorium, but she isn’t sick. Her dad is the top psychiatrist there. But one day Mae breaks a rule. NOT a good idea. This place is all about rules – and breaking them can hurt you…



Review:
'See How They Lie' is the second book by Sue Wallman and in my opinion, much better than her debut YA novel.  This is a psychological thriller set at a wellness centre for psychiatric and troubled teens.  Although Hummingbird Creek sounds amazing and appears to have everything you could ever possibly want, the residents of the centre have no access to the outside world and restrictions are placed on what they eat, when they sleep, how much exercise they get and a hundred other things, including heavily filtered access to the internet.  Instead of sounding like a perfect paradise, it ended up resembling something more like a prison.

The main character Mae, lives with her mother and Doctor father at Hummingbird Creek.  It's the only home she has ever really known and she has very few memories of life out in the real world.  Mae has a close friendship with one of the other residents, Drew and together the two of them revel in tiny acts of rebellion which make them feel like they are living, rather than being kept prisoner. 

As the story unfolds, Mae begins to suspect that everything may not be quite as it seems.  Her teacher, Mrs Ray, is worried about he gaps in Mae's education.  Mae herself, begins to suspect that the vitamins she is given on a regular basis, may not be quite so innocent after all and her mother exhibits worrying behaviour that leads her to investigate what is really going on.

I loved following Mae's journey to discovery and found myself gripped by multiple revelations.  My only real disappointment with this book was the last few chapters, when everything was wrapped up really quickly.  I would have liked more of a big finale and I was waiting for something a little more spectacular to happen.  After drawing out the threads of the big reveal, it seemed like everything was concluded much too quickly.  That aside, I enjoyed 'See How They Lie' a lot and found it a quick and intriguing read.

Tuesday, 21 March 2017

Review: Gilded Cage - Vic James

Gilded Cage by Vic James, published by Pan Macmillan on 26th January 2017

Goodreads synopsis:
Our world belongs to the Equals—aristocrats with magical gifts—and all commoners must serve them for ten years. But behind the gates of England's grandest estate lies a power that could break the world.

Abi is a servant to England's most powerful family, but her spirit is free. So when she falls for one of the noble-born sons, Abi faces a terrible choice. Uncovering the family's secrets might win her liberty, but will her heart pay the price?

Abi's brother, Luke, is enslaved in a brutal factory town. Far from his family and cruelly oppressed, he makes friends whose ideals could cost him everything. Now Luke has discovered there may be a power even greater than magic: revolution.


Review:
I thought that this book was brilliant!  It really took me by surprise and swept me away to a modern Britain where slavery still exists and where magic runs in the air. It was an unusual mix of historical and urban fantasy genres but it blended together so well.

The premise of 'Gilded Cage' is that there is a magical aristocracy that all commoners have to serve for ten years of their life.  The story follows one family, the Hadleys, who all agree to serve their ten years together at the beck and call of one of the most ruthless magical family of all - the Jardines. However, while Abi and Daisy end up with their parents, their sibling Luke is taken away to Millmoor, a slave factory town.

I initially found the book slightly confusing because nearly every chapter is alternatively told from a different characters' perspective.  In the first ten chapters alone, there are six different points of view.  What made all the difference was when the characters began to grow on the page and I developed a picture of them in my mind.  It was then much easier to visualise them and their stories.  My favourite chapters were at Kyneston with the majority of the Hadley family. The magical element of the book was so unusual that I found everything that happened absolutely fascinating. 

The Jardines themselves were also incredibly interesting.  There is brutal Gavar who I couldn't decide if I liked or hated, middle brother Jenner who I immediately wanted to see more of and younger brother Silyen who is the most mysterious one of them all.  He has a dark skill that may change the world but was incredibly enigmatic and mercurial.

I'm not always a big fan of fantasy books but this was definitely my cup of tea.  It had a really intriguing and original plot which had me hooked.  I loved the whole concept for the series and I'm dying now to read the next in the Dark Gifts trilogy.

Thursday, 16 March 2017

Review: The Scarecrow Queen - Melinda Salisbury

The Scarecrow Queen by Melinda Salisbury, published by Scholastic on 2nd March 2017

Goodreads synopsis:
As the Sleeping Prince tightens his hold on Lormere and Tregellan, the net closes in on the ragged band of rebels trying desperately to defeat him. Twylla and Errin are separated, isolated, and running out of time. The final battle is coming, and Aurek will stop at nothing to keep the throne forever . . .




Review:
The eagerly awaited finale to the series is finally here!  There was no stopping me after I got my hands on this book and I couldn't wait to dive straight in.  This was a fitting end to a superb series which did not disappoint.

Although I thought that the previous book, 'The Sleeping Prince' had suffered a little bit from middle book syndrome, Melinda Salisbury held nothing back in 'The Scarecrow Queen' which was an exciting and explosive read. 

Twylla and Errin may have been separated and their forces divided, but they are by no means defeated yet, as we see them preparing to do battle against the Sleeping Prince.  The book alternates between their two perspectives as each has their own challenges to face in the final show down.  I actually ended up enjoying the parts of the story told by Errin the most, as she quite literally has to extricate herself from under Aurek's control.  He was very creepy and such a great villain in the story.  Errin has an ally in Merek and desperately wants to save Silas too but her situation is precarious.  Twylla meanwhile is attempting to bring together a band of rebels as the time for battle draws near.  I enjoyed seeing all of the characters and the threads of everyone's' stories gradually coming together

The story was fast-paced and gripping and there were some incredible twists and turns lying in wait.  I couldn't have guessed how the story was going to be concluded but it was genuine brilliance.   

A perfect example of a YA fantasy series that knocks your socks off!  I loved it and can't wait to read more by Melinda Salisbury in the future. 

Tuesday, 14 March 2017

Review: See You in the Cosmos - Jack Cheng

See You in the Cosmos by Jack Cheng, published by Puffin on 2nd March 2017

Goodreads synopsis:
11-year-old Alex Petroski loves space and rockets, his mom, his brother, and his dog Carl Sagan-named for his hero, the real-life astronomer. All he wants is to launch his golden iPod into space the way Carl Sagan (the man, not the dog) launched his Golden Record on the Voyager spacecraft in 1977. From Colorado to New Mexico, Las Vegas to L.A., Alex records a journey on his iPod to show other lifeforms what life on earth, his earth, is like. But his destination keeps changing. And the funny, lost, remarkable people he meets along the way can only partially prepare him for the secrets he'll uncover-from the truth about his long-dead dad to the fact that, for a kid with a troubled mom and a mostly not-around brother, he has way more family than he ever knew.


Review:
I hadn't heard of this title before reading it, so I started it not having any particular expectations of the content.  I found myself instantly drawn into Alex's story and ultimately found 'See You In The Cosmos' to be a delightful and entrancing read.

It reminded me a bit of 'Wonder' by R.J. Palacio in the way that I was drawn to the main character of Alex.  He is an incredible individual and for an eleven year old boy is both brave and true and very inspirational.  When he embarks upon a journey with his dog Carl Sagan, to launch his own rocket into space, he meets an eclectic group of individuals along the way and learns some hard truths about his own family history.

Each chapter is structured like a dialogue by Alex about his journey.  His voice is true and authentic and made me love him even more.  There should be more characters like him in middle-grade fiction. 

The book deals with some serious issues such as mental illness and the affect it can have on a family but the overall message is one of positivity and hope and made me believe that Alex would be alright in the end. 

This is a word of mouth treat that is sure to be a big hit in 2017.  It most definitely won me over!

Tuesday, 21 February 2017

Review: All About Mia - Lisa Williamson

All About Mia by Lisa Williamson, published by David Fickling Books on 2nd February 2017

Goodreads synopsis:
From no. 1 Bestselling YA author Lisa Williamson, comes another insightful and unputdownable teen drama - All About Mia. A brilliant look into the mind of a teenager stuck in the middle.




Review:
‘All About Mia’ was a really fun and entertaining contemporary YA read. I finished it in one sitting because once I’d turned the first page, I was utterly absorbed into the story. I was surprised just how much I enjoyed it actually but I think it was exactly the sort of book I was looking for at the time.

The story is about three sisters and is narrated by middle-sister Mia. At the start of the book, her older sister Grace is coming home early from her gap year travels, while her younger sister Audrey is focused on school and swimming. Mia falls in the middle and this is precisely where she doesn’t want to be. She is the rebel of the family and is always the one pushing the limits with her mum and dad. She does stupid things and she can be pretty wild at times but as we get to know Mia we see that a lot of her behaviour is just a defence she puts up. She doesn’t always know where she fits in and what her niche is and this often causes problems, particularly with Grace who has always been the perfect daughter. 

I loved this book because the story was so relatable. I don’t have sisters but I do have two siblings and I am a middle child and while I can’t claim to be anything like Mia at all, I could identify with her in a lot of ways. Lisa Williamson’s writing and characterisations are spot on too and I really enjoyed seeing how the family dynamics changed and evolved in the book. 

Audrey was my favourite sister and I’m glad she got a bit more page time in the second half of the story. She is always trying to keep the peace between her older siblings and sometimes gets forgotten because she’s not always the loudest or the liveliest. I thought she was a very sweet character though and I liked her focus and determination.

A brilliant read about love and family and fitting in. I would highly recommend.      

Thursday, 16 February 2017

Review: Dramarama - E. Lockhart

Dramarama by E. Lockhart, published by Hot Key Books on 9th February 2017


Goodreads synopsis:
Two theater-mad, self-invented, fabulositon Ohio teenagers.

One boy, one girl.
One gay, one straight.
One black, one white.

And SUMMER DRAMA CAMP.






Review:
‘Dramarama’ sounded like a fun and entertaining read, incorporating one of my favourite things…the theatre! The story is about two friends who get accepted into a drama summer school. We see them on their journey there with dreams, hopes and aspirations of becoming big stars and escaping their small town lives. The narrative unfolds from the perspective of Sarah, or Sayde as she likes to be known. She has always felt that she is destined for bigger and greater things and through her love of the theatre she believes that she has a chance at becoming something more. Her best friend Demi is quite a character and comes across as thoroughly flamboyant and over the top. I wasn’t sure that he ever really grew on me throughout the book and some of his actions near the end of the story were questionable.

What I loved the most about this title were all the theatre references to shows and stars that I’ve seen, enjoyed and loved myself. I couldn’t identify with the longing to become a star in front of the curtain but I could identify with the pleasure and enjoyment that Sayde feels for an amazing song or a well-choreographed routine. It made me want to rush out immediately and buy a ticket to go and see something. The author states that she attended a summer drama school herself when she was younger and I think this probably helped to make the experience in the book more authentic.

I can’t say however, that the story itself particularly resonated with me. It was light, it was fluffy and apart from one or two scenes in the book, it stayed that way for the most part. I felt that the plot was a bit flat and I kept waiting for something more to happen. I wasn’t hugely keen on the ending either which I felt didn’t have enough drama. It was a quick read which I finished in one evening but it’s not a book that I’ll want to come back to in the future.   

Monday, 13 February 2017

Review: The Mystery of the Painted Dragon - Katherine Woodfine

The Mystery of the Painted Dragon by Katherine Woodfine, published by Egmont on 9th February 2017

Goodreads synopsis:
When a priceless painting is stolen, our dauntless heroines Sophie and Lil find themselves faced with forgery, trickery and deceit on all sides!

Be amazed as the brave duo pit their wits against this perilous puzzle! Marvel at their cunning plan to unmask the villain and prove themselves detectives to be reckoned with – no matter what dangers lie ahead . . .

It’s their most perilous adventure yet!



Review:
'The Mystery of the Painted Dragon' is the third book in the Sinclair's Mysteries series about friends Sophie and Lil who repeatedly find themselves embroiled in mystery and mayhem.  The series is in a similar vein to Robin Stevens's Murder Most Unladylike books, although this is aimed at a middle grade readership.  I haven't actually read the previous two books about the intrepid duo but I don't think it really mattered as the story was standalone and the characters were easy to get to know.  I do now want to get my hands on them though because this was such an enjoyable read that I'm sure the first two books are equally as good.    

The story finds Lil and Sophie investigating the theft of a painting called 'The Green Dragon'. This throws them into the path of another young female and a budding artist called Leo.  As the girls follow a series of puzzling clues and suspicion is cast on a number of different characters, it becomes clear that danger lies in wait around every corner.  They also have the shadowy figure of the 'Baron' to contend with.  Ooh, I love a good baddie!

I adored the historical setting of the book, with the story being set in 1909.  It's a time when girls are trying to follow their dreams but society is still geared towards the advancement of men.  Leo is a prime example of this as she tries to pursue a career in the arts, while also appeasing her family. 

This was a fab read with a great mystery, fun adventure and lovely characters.  I've wanted to read this series for ages and I wasn't disappointed.  The next in the series is published in October and will be called 'The Mystery Peacock'.  That gives me plenty of time to acquaint myself with the first two books about Lil and Sophie and the beginning of their adventures together.

Thursday, 9 February 2017

Review: Ink - Alice Broadway

Ink by Alice Broadway, published by Scholastic on 2nd February 2017

Goodreads synopsis:
Every action, every deed, every significant moment is tattooed on your skin for ever. When Leora's father dies, she is determined to see her father remembered forever. She knows he deserves to have all his tattoos removed and made into a Skin Book to stand as a record of his good life. But when she discovers that his ink has been edited and his book is incomplete, she wonders whether she ever knew him at all.


Review:
'Ink' is a captivating read and a marvellous debut from author Alice Broadway.  The first in a trilogy, I was engrossed in Leora's story from the very first chapter.  Broadway writes with an easy style which immediately drew me into the book and I thought that both her plot and characterisation were spot on. I really only meant to read a few chapters but I ended up devouring the story in one sitting.

The premise of the story is a society in which each individual tattoos their life story onto their bodies.  The tattoos are a permanent record of their names, family trees and significant others.  They show that they are a good person with nothing to hide.  Certain people within their society are able to read tattoos, of which Leora is one.  When someone dies, their tattoos stand as a testament to the person and if they are deemed worthy, are made into a Skin Book which the family are able to keep as a record of their life.  At the beginning of the book, Leora's father dies and much of the story revolves around whether or not he is entitled to have his own book.  In the process, Leora discovers secrets about her father that lead her to conclude that she may not have truly known what kind of person he was.

The way of life of the society is threatened by Blanks.  People who do not carry tattoos on their skin.  They are considered to be subversive and dangerous.  Leora has always been warned against them until she begins to discover a threatening connection of her own to them.

'Ink' was a brilliant read which felt very fresh and original.  I haven't come across a YA book that I've enjoyed quite as much as this in such a long time.  I'm excited to see where Leora's story will take her and I'm full of anticipation about the next steps of her journey.  A cracking read which I would recommend without hesitation.    

Monday, 6 February 2017

Review: Take the Key and Lock Her Up - Ally Carter

Take the Key and Lock Her Up by Ally Carter, published by Orchard Books on 26th January 2017

Goodreads synopsis:
Grace has discovered that she's the lost princess of Adria ... but some people would prefer she stay lost. With her brother's life hanging in the balance and secret assassins everywhere, life on Embassy Row has never been more dangerous.



Review:
Ally Carter does it again with what is without a doubt the best instalment of the whole series.  I've been desperate to read 'Take the Key and Lock Her Up' ever since the almighty cliff-hanger ending of 'See How They Run', when Grace discovered that she was the lost princess of Adria.  I dived into this book and devoured it in one sitting because it is pretty much impossible to put down.  Carter doesn't let her foot off of the break once as the story speeds along at an incredible pace.  I was on the edge of my seat from start to finish.

Grace is a terrific character and one who I've grown to like and admire more with each book.  She is tough and determined and pretty kick-ass.  All of the struggles and adversity she has had to face have only made her stronger and more single-minded.  She will do anything to protect the people she loves, even if it means sacrificing herself in the process.  She is also very unpredictable which makes her an exciting character to read about because you are never sure what she will end up doing next. Throughout the story she faces danger from every corner and you are left guessing about where the true threat actually lies.  Is it with the Royal Family or the shadowy Society?

Her romance with Alexei is one of my favourite things about this book.  Their relationship has evolved from friendship to love and I adore the moments when they are being protective of each other, as well as all of those sizzling kisses. I was really rooting for them and I wanted Grace to finally get her happy ending in his arms.  I also liked the way that Grace's other friends rallied around her and helped in whatever way they could.  They are determined not to let her face the danger alone.   

The story hurtled from one thrilling escapade to another and I was utterly glued to the pages.  I had no idea what was going to happen next or who was going to make it out alive.  I loved 'Take the Key and Lock Her Up' and I'm only sad that such a fabulous series has come to an end.  Hopefully Ally Carter will be back soon with another new adventure.

Thursday, 26 January 2017

Review: The Memory Book - Lara Avery

The Memory Book by Lara Avery, published by Quercus Children's Books on 26th January 2017

Goodreads synopsis:
Samantha McCoy has it all mapped out. First she's going to win the national debating championship, then she's going to move to New York and become a human rights lawyer. But when Sammie discovers that a rare disease is going to take away her memory, the future she'd planned so perfectly is derailed before it’s started. What she needs is a new plan.

So the Memory Book is born: Sammie’s notes to her future self, a document of moments great and small. Realising that her life won't wait to be lived, she sets out on a summer of firsts: The first party; The first rebellion; The first friendship; The last love.

Through a mix of heartfelt journal entries, mementos, and guest posts from friends and family, readers will fall in love with Sammie, a brave and remarkable girl who learns to live and love life fully, even though it's not the life she planned.


Review:
Yes, this book will make you cry, so be prepared.  It's a moving and emotional read so buckle up.

Sam McCoy is seventeen and has a genetic disease which will eventually lead to her losing her memory.  She will forget who she is, who her family are and what she had planned for her future.  Sam decides to take action by starting to write down and record her memories.  She hopes that this will help her to preserve who she is.  Although she has big plans for her future, which include going to College in New York and becoming a human rights lawyer, everything has to change as her illness starts to progress. 

At the beginning of the book, Sam is functioning pretty normally.  She is set to compete at the national debating championship, she is just about keeping on top of her school work and she has a huge crush on Stuart Shah, a boy who used to go to her school.  She's dealing with life and has a positive outlook on her future.  Her illness is not something that she is going to let define her.  I loved her drive and her optimism and her bravery in moving on with her life.  As the story progresses, so do the symptoms of the disease and this was hard to read about at times.  One of the things I also adored in the book was her relationship with her family. Her Mum and Dad are hugely supportive while at the same time being protective and I thought her three siblings were incredibly sweet. 

The last couple of chapters in the book were gutting, I'm not going to lie.  I was blubbering away like a baby at the end as it packed a real emotional punch.  The story has inspired me to live life to the full and to make the most of every moment. 

Thursday, 19 January 2017

Review: Beware That Girl - Teresa Toten

Beware That Girl by Teresa Toten, published by Hot Key Books on 12th January 2017

Goodreads synopsis:
Kate O'Brien has always been known as the scholarship kid, running away from a terrible past and overcoming obstacles, some more sinister than others. She's determined to make a better life for herself. She deserves it. And at the elite Waverly school, Kate is willing to do whatever it takes to climb the social ladder and land her spot at Yale.

There's one girl in particular that catches Kate's eye. Olivia Michelle Sumner, all born blonde and rich and just messed up enough for Kate to latch on to. As for Olivia, she's a damaged girl, looking to be mended. She finds something promising in Kate. A study buddy. A best friend. A sister she never had. But even a vulnerable girl like Olivia has her own dark past to contend with.

When the handsome and whip-smart Mark Redkin joins the Waverly administration, he manages to woo the whole student body, paying particular attention to Olivia - an affair she very much wants to keep to herself, especially from Kate. And as a man who knows just how to get what he wants, Kate realises that Mark poses a huge threat, in more ways than she is willing to admit.


Review:
This book is described as Gossip Girl meets Pretty Little Liars.  That was enough to make me want to read it.  I don't always like psychological thrillers but I was willing to give this one a try.  It's set to be a big screen film with Dakota Fanning so I thought I would read the book first.

There are two main characters in the story, Kate O'Brien and Olivia Sumner.  Kate is the poor scholarship student who is desperate to get into Yale and determined to use Olivia's wealth and social connections to help her do so.  I didn't like Kate at all the beginning but the author threw in some brilliant twists and turns and by the end, I was rooting for her one hundred percent. The story is very cat and mouse until everything gets turned on its head.  My opinions of many of the characters had to be revised and I had to rethink a lot of the things which had happened in the book.  

The friendship between the two girls seems to be going well until Mark Redkin, the new educational director in charge of fundraising, enters the scene. Suddenly three is very much a crowd and Kate is no longer in control.  I did find that some of the scenes between Mark and Olivia were pretty disturbing and not to my taste at all.  I thought that they went a bit too far and at times seemed unnecessarily brutal but I guess the author was using this to set up the big finale.  The second half of the book got extremely dark and twisted and although I was intrigued, part of me didn't really want to find out what was going to happen. 

I didn't see the ending coming at all, although I'm sure many readers will but I do think that it was very clever and flash-backed to the beginning of the book.  Probably not quite to my reading tastes but I think that fans of this genre will probably enjoy it.       

Tuesday, 17 January 2017

Review: Carve the Mark - Veronica Roth

Carve the Mark by Veronica Roth, published by HarperCollins on 17th January 2017

Goodreads synopsis:
On a planet where violence and vengeance rule, in a galaxy where some are favored by fate, everyone develops a currentgift, a unique power meant to shape the future. While most benefit from their currentgifts, Akos and Cyra do not—their gifts make them vulnerable to others’ control. Can they reclaim their gifts, their fates, and their lives, and reset the balance of power in this world?

Cyra is the sister of the brutal tyrant who rules the Shotet people. Cyra’s currentgift gives her pain and power—something her brother exploits, using her to torture his enemies. But Cyra is much more than just a blade in her brother’s hand: she is resilient, quick on her feet, and smarter than he knows.

Akos is from the peace-loving nation of Thuvhe, and his loyalty to his family is limitless. Though protected by his unusual currentgift, once Akos and his brother are captured by enemy Shotet soldiers, Akos is desperate to get his brother out alive—no matter what the cost. When Akos is thrust into Cyra’s world, the enmity between their countries and families seems insurmountable. They must decide to help each other to survive—or to destroy one another.



Review:
I was really thrilled to get my hands on 'Carve the Mark', although I couldn't quite tell from reading the synopsis what the story was going to be all about.  I loved Veronica Roth's Divergent series and I was really interested to see how her writing had changed and what direction she would take her storytelling in next.  This was such a treat to dive straight into!

I found the first half of the book, particularly the opening five or six chapters, unfolded at quite a slow pace.  Admittedly there was a lot of world building though and introductions were made to many of the main characters and their families.  I did find some of the characters' names bewildering and difficult to keep track of and I was a little puzzled about a few of the things that happened early on in the story.  I did go back to read a couple of sections again and that helped a lot. 

Luckily the story picked up a lot and I was gradually drawn further and further into the intrigue and action.  The main pull for me was the two main protagonists, Akos and Cyra.  Each chapter alternated between their two perspectives giving you different insights into their lives.  They have extremely contrasting personalities which was interesting.  Akos is extremely emotional and attached to his family, where as Cyra has learnt how to be tough and strong and operates more as an individual.  One of the dominant ideas in the story is that each person has a currentgift which is an extension of their personality.  Cyra and Akos find that their currentgifts almost compliment each other and this is one of the elements which brings them together.  Although I didn't love them as much as Tris and Four (I mean come on!), they were still an intriguing couple. 

Parts of the story actually made me think of Romeo and Juliet.  There are two rival nations, Thuvhe and Shotet and each is fighting for supremacy.  Cyra and Akos find themselves caught in the middle but their relationship seemed to me like it would prove to be pivotal to the overall outcome.      

The ending was absolutely brilliant with a shock revelation to keep you glued to the edge of your seat.  I really want to read the next instalment of the duology now.  I have to say that as a Veronica Roth fan, I didn't enjoy it as much as Divergent which grabbed me from the very beginning.  However, 'Carve the Mark' improved massively in the second half and has left me wanting more.   

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